Cloud uptake in Australia soars with IaaS spending set to reach $1 billion by 2020

Telsyte maturity model shows cloud finding favour for testing and development, as ICT priorities change

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – Australian enterprises are boosting their usage and increasing their spending on public cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) according to new research from emerging technology analyst firm Telsyte.

The Australian IaaS market is on track to grow by over 60 per cent reaching $621M in 2016 and forecast to reach $1.049 billion by 2020. More than half of CIOs surveyed by Telsyte are planning to invest more in IaaS in the next 12 months.

The Telsyte Australian Infrastructure & Cloud Computing Market Study 2017 reveals local cloud uptake and spending has been driven by changing ICT priorities, with IT infrastructure management becoming a top ICT priority for Australian CIOs in the past 12 months, matching IT Security for the first time.

Telsyte research shows big data analytics, storage, IoT, artificial intelligence and process digitisation are all driving the demand for cloud services as enterprises work towards modernising legacy systems and deploying new workloads.

Fewer than 10 per cent of organisations with greater than 20 staff are not using any form of IaaS, indicating cloud services have quickly become a mainstream way of delivering IT infrastructure in Australia.

The study debuts Telsyte cloud computing maturity model for the Australian enterprise market which segments companies by six levels of maturity. Findings show that despite cloud uptake growing strongly, only 30 per cent of organisations are in the top two most mature levels.

“The use of cloud aligns well with Australian enterprise ICT and business priorities; however, we still have some way to go before most organisations are using cloud to its full potential,” Telsyte Senior Analyst, Rodney Gedda says.

Telsyte’s research found reliability and support factors far exceed cost for organisations when choosing a Managed Service Provider (MSP) or pure cloud provider.

Cloud-first policies overshadow cloud restrictions

More than a third (34%) of Australian enterprises now have a “cloud first” policy which is outweighing restrictions on cloud use, further driving uptake.

“As more global providers have extended their infrastructure to Australia, the data residency arguments for not using cloud have waned,” Gedda says.

According to Telsyte research, selective cloud use is favoured by Australian CIOs over blanket off-premises adoption as applications like content management, backups, DR and software development are moved to pure clouds and managed service providers.

Private cloud use up as organisations work to hybrid future

In addition to the growing appetite for public cloud services, Australian CIOs are investing in private cloud technology to enable more rapid service delivery.

With 78 per cent of enterprises building or planning to build a private cloud, it is looking like the preferred on-premises architecture for future deployments and infrastructure refresh programs.

Gedda says with more virtualisation and acceptance of cloud automation and self-service the platform is set for a hybrid cloud future where workloads are provisioned in response to business and application demands.

“There are many applications where it still makes business sense to deploy on private infrastructure, but having the agility to pick and choose the right cloud service for any application is the big promise of hybrid cloud,” he says.

CIOs are developing private clouds to respond to “business unit self-service”, which has risen to be second only to “more flexibility”.

Cloud containers, NaaS to drive innovation

Operating system level virtualisation, or “containers”, is finding favour among enterprises with 70 per cent using or investigating their use. Containers allow applications to be more portable across on-premises, MSP or pure cloud infrastructure.

The adoption of cloud networking, or Networking-as-a-Service (NaaS), is also growing alongside its server and storage counterparts with nearly 30 per cent of enterprises using some form for NaaS – from VPNs to firewalls and application acceleration.

“There are big opportunities for NaaS to improve operations and drive innovation as much of the complexity burden of network services is taken away from the customer,” Gedda says.

For further information on licensing the study or media enquiries contact:

Foad Fadaghi
Managing Director
Tel: +61 2 9235 5851
Twitter: @foadfadaghi
Email: ffadaghi@telsyte.com.au

Rodney Gedda
Senior Analyst
+61 2 9235 5891
Twitter: @rodneygedda
Email: rgedda@telsyte.com.au

Telsyte’s infrastructure and cloud research program provides leading insights into the technologies and services that are re-defining how Australian organisations, including the public sector, deploy and manage on-premises, MSP and cloud infrastructure and applications.

In preparing this study, Telsyte used:

  • An online survey of a representative sample of Australians CIOs and IT decision makers with 260 respondents completed in August 2016.
     
  • Interviews conducted with executives from software vendors, system integrators, hardware and cloud providers, as well as their channel partners.
     
  • On-going monitoring of local and global market and vendor trends.

About Telsyte

Telsyte delivers strategic insights and advisory services to businesses that are producing, or are impacted by, disruptive technologies. Telsyte publishes studies into emerging consumer and business markets and provides custom research and advisory services. Telsyte is an independent business unit of CSC. www.telsyte.com.au

The material in this article is copyright protected and not intended to be altered, copied, distributed or used for any commercial or non-commercial purpose, except for news reporting, comment, criticism, teaching and scholarship.

Developing new products and services now the top priority for Australian ICT leaders

Priorities shift away from costs savings, as enterprises embrace emerging tech, including robotics, mobile first and IoT

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – The priorities for Australian enterprises in 2016 have significantly changed from 2 years ago as organisations spend more of their IT budgets on product development and digital transformation initiatives, according to emerging technology analyst firm Telsyte.

The Telsyte Australian Digital Workplace Study 2017 is a survey-based study of a representative sample of Australian organisations across all verticals (including public sector) ranging from 20 to 20,000+ employees. With 420 CIO and IT decision maker respondents, it is one of the largest studies of its kind in Australia.

IT has become increasingly strategic for Australian organisations in a time of unprecedented change with two-thirds (67 per cent) of IT departments providing regular updates to the board of directors (up 7 per cent from 2014).

According to the study, IT is now seen as the main driver in “transforming” organisations and, on average, 57 per cent of IT budgets are now spent on transformation (32 per cent) or innovation (25 per cent) programs. Only 43 per cent on average is spent on operations or “keeping the lights on”.

Changing business priorities make IT more strategic

In order to combat domestic and international competition, CIOs say developing new products and services is the number one business priority, replacing operational cost savings as determined in the 2014 survey.

“A critical tipping point has been reached with Australian organisations rapidly adopting emerging technologies, developing new products and services and looking to ICT to build competitive advantage in the face of increased global competition, and driving an intelligent automation revolution” Telsyte Managing Director, Foad Fadaghi says.

Top business priorities for Australian CIOs in 2016 and 2017 are to introduce new products to avoid becoming irrelevant in a dynamic new marketplace, acquire and retain customers, and retain and develop skills. This contrasts with the 2014 priorities which were mainly to save money and generate greater profit through improving business processes and productivity.

New spending patterns meet new technologies

To achieve this transformation, CIOs are collaborating more with the heads of lines of business within their organisations where IT spending is increasing.

IT spend is spreading outside of traditional IT departments and more than half of CIOs believe line-of-business IT spending will exceed IT department spending within five years. 8 per cent of organisations believe spending by non-IT departments already exceeds IT department budgets.

Telsyte Senior Analyst, Steven Noble says so-called ‘Shadow IT’ is just a small part of a seismic shift in the role of IT in business.

“This change invites CIOs to play a leading role in determining how companies create new products and services, and in how they bring employees together to create value,” Noble says.

“These shifts are a direct outcome of the changing priorities facing the IT leader, and elevating CIOs to the status of ‘manager of complexity’ and strategic advisor unlike ever before.”

With this change in IT spending comes the uptake of a new generation of technologies that are tapping into the 25 per cent of budgets dedicated to innovation.

Telsyte 2016 digital workplace study highlights the following IT trends:

  • Cloud intentions are still strong, with 50 per cent of organisations intending to increase spending on Infrastructure as a Service.
     
  •  The software opportunity is shifting to Platform as a Service (PaaS) as 70 per cent of IT leaders use or intend to use PaaS solutions to develop and deploy software. PaaS is seen as a key enabler of building customised applications and the competitive advantage that comes from it. More than a third of organisations indicated challenges with software customisation, increasing the appetite for PaaS and in-house software skills and recruitment
     
  • Most organisations are now “mobile first”. 84 per cent of organisations have at least one system in place to allow their staff to be mobile workers, from providing a secure VPN system to actively supporting Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and Bring Your Own Apps (BYOA).
     
  • Adoption of Activity-Based Working is up 14 per cent during the past two years with 42 per cent of Australian enterprises now supporting it.
     
  • 3D Printing is gaining traction with 24 per cent using it or have exploratory projects in place.
     
  • 1 in 3 intend to use robotics and 25 per cent of large organisations (having >500 employees) are already using Robotic Process Automation (RPA).
     
  • Augmented Reality (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR) is of high interest with 57 per cent currently using or intending to use AR/MR technology. Interest in Microsoft’s HoloLens is very high.
     
  • IoT is quickly approaching mainstream with 22 per cent having IoT programs in production, or pilot programs and in development, while 29 per cent have IoT devices and a strategy, but nothing in operation yet.

“With larger budgets dedicated to innovation, Australian IT departments are jumping on new technologies for pilot projects and wider deployment at an unprecedented rate,” Fadaghi says.

For further information on the study or media enquiries contact:

Foad Fadaghi
Managing Director
Tel: +61 2 9235 5851
Twitter: @foadfadaghi
Email: ffadaghi@telsyte.com.au

Steven Noble
Senior Analyst
+61 404 041 928
Twitter: @steven_noble
Email: snoble@telsyte.com.au

Telsyte’s digital workplace research program provides leading insights into the technologies and services that are re-defining how Australian organisations, including the public sector, deploy and manage ICT budgets, infrastructure and applications.

In preparing this study, Telsyte used:

  • An online survey of a representative sample of Australians CIOs and IT decision makers with 420 respondents completed in August 2016.
     
  • Interviews conducted with executives from software vendors, system integrators, hardware and cloud providers, as well as their channel partners.
     
  • On-going monitoring of local and global market and vendor trends.

About Telsyte

Telsyte delivers strategic insights and advisory services to businesses that are producing, or are impacted by, disruptive technologies. Telsyte publishes studies into emerging consumer and business markets and provides custom research and advisory services. Telsyte is an independent business unit of CSC. www.telsyte.com.au

 The material in this article is copyright protected and not intended to be altered, copied, distributed or used for any commercial or non-commercial purpose, except for news reporting, comment, criticism, teaching and scholarship.

Australian tablet sales bounce back as new higher end PC replacement devices enter the market

Unit sales grow for first time in two years off the back of convertible ‘2-in-1’s

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – Sales of tablet devices in Australia grew 4 per cent year-on-year to 1.59 million units in the first half of 2016, according to a new study from emerging technology analyst firm Telsyte.

The Telsyte Australian Media Tablet Market Study 2016-2020 shows the market for tablets has stablised and recorded modest growth for the first time (half-on-half) since 2014.

As predicted by Telsyte in March 2016, higher end convertible tablet-notebook devices (including Apple’s iPad Pro, Microsoft’s Surface and the Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro S) have seen growing adoption and have now halted the decline in unit sales after the market took a battering following a collapse in sub-premium devices in 2014.

The top four vendors in H1, 2016 were Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and Lenovo – which collectively sold 80 per cent of units.

The market is on track to record sales of 3.21 million units by the end of the year, as consumers start to replace ageing tablets and computers with newer, more functional touch screen devices.

“The decline in tablet sales that began in 2014 has stabilised and the market seems to have started to turn a corner,” Telsyte Managing Director, Foad Fadaghi, says.

Revenue from the market is the highest it has been since the slump in H1 2014. Sales are up 33 per cent on H1 2015 as the market starts to embrace more expensive 2-in-1 devices rather than lower-end, slate-only formats. 

Despite a fall in market share, Telsyte believes Apple will retain its market leadership in the next 2 years as consumers replace ageing iPads. Apple continues to enjoy a repeat purchase intention rate of 80 per cent, according to Telsyte research, and many of the top selling iPad models from a few years ago are now unsupported, such as the third generation iPad (released in March 2012) and the iPad 2 (released in March 2011). These devices are no longer capable of loading the latest iOS 10 operating system.

Convertible 2-in-1s set the pace

Telsyte end-user research shows that 1 in 5 tablet users have already tried using their tablet with a keyboard (as a 2-in-1) including buying an aftermarket keyboard (or combination case/keyboard). Of these, nearly three quarters continue using a keyboard with their tablet regularly. The rise of 2-in-1s is expected to also drive demand for other tablet accessories, such as protective covers, styluses and port extensions and adapters.

One in five (21%) tablets sold in H1, 2016 were Windows-based devices, indicating a growing trend which has been driven by Microsoft-branded tablets. Microsoft retains leadership in the Windows 2-in-1 category according to Telsyte’s latest findings[1].

Similarly, over 20 per cent of devices sold had screens above 10-inches, indicating a shift to using tablet devices for more than just portable content consumption.

"Telsyte believes sales of Windows-based tablets should exceed Android-based unit sales within the next 18 months,” Fadaghi says.

Telsyte also notes that Android tablet sales might also be impacted by the Samsung Note 7 recall and eventual withdrawal, despite the Note 7 not being in the tablet category.

Telsyte’s tablet study includes estimates of computer purchase intentions, as the tablet and computer market increasingly merge. Findings show that a PC replacement cycle is due with more than 700 thousand PCs and Macs (without touchscreens) are expected to be sold in the second half of 2016 with around 12 per cent of these units being Apple computers.

Telsyte figures show that 15.1 million Australians have now got access to a tablet device or almost two thirds of people across all age groups.

For further information on the study or media inquiries contact:

Foad Fadaghi
Managing Director
Tel: +61 2 9235 5851
Twitter: @foadfadaghi
Email: ffadaghi@telsyte.com.au

About Telsyte’s Australian Media Tablet Market Study 2016-2020

Media Tablet definition:  A computer device consisting of a 7 to 14 inch touch screen, including 2-in-1 devices with detachable or foldable keyboards that provide a tablet form factor experience.

2-in-1 definition: Primarily refer to laptops that have a touch screen and detachable keyboards or foldable form factor to provide a pure tablet-like experience. Tablets that are known for their versatility and mimic laptop-like experience with keyboards or type covers are also considered as 2-in-1s. E.g. Microsoft Surface tablets, iPad Pro, Samsung Galaxy TabPro S, Google Pixel C, Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet, Toshiba Portege Z20t, or Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro.

[1] Please note Telsyte measures Apple iPad Pro models as 2-in-1s for comparison reasons, due to having a specifically designed Apple keyboard, typically sold together.

Telsyte’s Australian Media Tablet Market Study 2016-2020 is a comprehensive 103 page report which provides subscribers with:

  •    Market sizing, platform and vendor market shares and forecasts
  •    End user trends across devices, usage, platforms and accessories
  •    Tablet and computer purchase intentions and loyalty
  •    Product reviews and insights
  •    Tablet audience estimates and strategies for media companies

In preparing this study, Telsyte used:

  •    An online survey of a representative sample of Australians 16+ years of age conducted with 1,097 respondents in July 2016. An additional 394 Australian respondents, 16 years of age and older were surveyed to specifically determine smartphone, smart wearables and tablet purchases made between January 1 2016 to June 30 2016
  •    Financial reports released by mobile carriers, manufacturers and service providers.
  •    Interviews conducted with executives from mobile operators, vendors, retailers, and channel partners.
  •    On-going monitoring of local and global market and vendor trends.

About Telsyte

Telsyte delivers strategic insights and advisory services to businesses that are producing, or are impacted by, disruptive technologies. Telsyte publishes studies into emerging consumer and business markets and provides custom research and advisory services. Telsyte is an independent business unit of CSC. www.telsyte.com.au

The material in this article is copyright protected and not intended to be altered, copied, distributed or used for any commercial or non-commercial purpose, except for news reporting, comment, criticism, teaching and scholarship.

Virtual reality set to invade Australian lounge rooms as consoles-based VR ignites consumer interest

2.5 million Australian households expected to have virtual reality headsets by 2020

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – Demand by video gamers is expected to drive a boom in VR headset sales throughout the holiday season, according to a new study from emerging technology analyst firm Telsyte.

The Telsyte Australian VR & AR Market Study 2017 predicts 115,000 VR headset units will be sold in the second half of 2016 with sales rapidly growing to over 500,000 units in 2017. In H2 2016, Telsyte estimates that 46 per cent of unit sales will be console-based VR systems, 46 per cent mobile VR and the remaining 8 per cent PC-based systems.

By 2020, Telsyte estimates over 3.3 million units will have been sold in Australia (of all types) reaching a household penetration of 22.3 per cent or 2.5 million households, as more consumers are drawn in by the immersive attraction of virtual reality.

Telsyte research shows that 75 per cent of Australians over the age of 16 are now aware of VR, up from 49 per cent in October 2015. The backing of multinational brands such as Google, Facebook and Sony has helped lift awareness and created pent-up demand in Australia.

Telsyte predicts Sony’s PlayStation®VR (PS VR) will be the lounge room leader given the large installed base of PlayStation®4 (PS4™) home consoles capable of utilising PlayStation VR. Telsyte estimates that there are in excess of 1 million PS4 consoles in Australian households, making it a mainstream platform for the adoption of VR. Accordingly, Telsyte estimates 65 per cent of VR hardware revenue will be generated by PlayStation VR in H2 2016. This prediction is backed by Telsyte survey findings which indicate that 20 per cent of PS4 users indicate a desire to buy a VR headset.

Mobile VR is expected to also generate strong sales, but current technological limitations (e.g. not having full 3D head tracking) will limit its use and applications, in particular with video games. Telsyte believes mobile VR will remain a gateway for many consumers to more functional systems but will remain an important platform for VR movies, and 360 video applications such as documentaries, eCommerce and education.

Telsyte believes video gaming will be a key driver for the adoption of VR in Australia. 76 per cent of those interested in buying a VR unit indicated they ‘want to purchase a VR device to have an enhanced gaming experience’, while 66 per cent indicated that they were interested in applications other than gaming, including movies, education, sports viewing, events, and eCommerce.

Nearly 1 in 3 regular game buyers (28 per cent) indicated a desire to purchase a VR headset according to a survey conducted by Telsyte in March 2016 for the Interactive Games Entertainment Association (IGEA). Of these, 40 per cent indicated a desire to purchase a VR headset as soon as 2016. Telsyte estimates that there are more than 5 million regular video games buyers in Australia, making for a vibrant pool of potential early adopters across PC, console and mobile VR platforms.

“Entertainment will be the main driver of VR adoption in Australia, however, organisations of all types are excited by the prospects of developing VR applications” Telsyte Managing Director, Foad Fadaghi says.

Telsyte research conducted with CIOs and IT decisions makers in August 2016, indicated that some 60 per cent of Australian and New Zealand organisations had already begun developing or were considering developing VR applications, for either internal and external (customer facing) uses.

Despite the technological developments in VR, there still remains some concerns around the health impacts of prolonged use. One in three Australians surveyed by Telsyte indicated they were “concerned about the health effects of VR” with the main concerns relating to the impact on eyesight (52 per cent) and “not enough knowledge of health effects” (48 per cent).

*In addition to the announced and available products in the market in October 2016, Telsyte predicts there will likely be new market entrants in the VR and AR market in the forecast period, including games console manufactures (other than PlayStation), smart device vendors (e.g. Apple) and other entertainment and visual/display technology brands.

For further information on the study or media inquiries contact:

Foad Fadaghi
Managing Director
Tel: +61 2 8297 4651
Twitter: @foadfadaghi
Email: ffadaghi@telsyte.com.au

About Telsyte’s VR & AR Market Study 2017

Telsyte’s Australian VR & AR Market Study 2017 is a comprehensive 69 page report and advisory service offering subscribers:

  • Market sizing estimates, platform and vendor market shares, hardware revenues and forecasts
  • End user trends across platforms
  • Application development trends
  • Purchase intentions and use cases
  • Device profiles and ratings
  • Audience estimates and forecasts useful for contentand application developers

In preparing this study, Telsyte used:

  • Interviews conducted with executives from VR and AR vendors, retailers, software developers, game publishers and channel partners.
  • Hands on testing of devices by analysts, including pre-release and post release products.
  • An online survey of a representative sample of 1,097 Australians 16+ years of age conducted in July 2016
  • An online survey of 302 CIOs and IT decision makers in Australian and New Zealand organisations with 20+ employees (Australia) and 10+ employees (New Zealand) in August 2016
  • An online survey of a representative sample of 1,029 Australian video game buyers 16+ years of age conducted for IGEA in March 2016
  • Financial reports released by manufacturers, publishers and service providers.
  • On-going monitoring of global and local market trends and vendors.

About Telsyte

Telsyte delivers strategic insights and advisory services to businesses that are producing, or are impacted by, disruptive technologies. Telsyte publishes studies into emerging consumer and business markets and provides custom research and advisory services. Telsyte is an independent business unit of CSC. www.telsyte.com.au

The material in this article is copyright protected and not intended to be altered, copied, distributed or used for any commercial or non-commercial purpose, except for news reporting, comment, criticism, teaching and scholarship.

 

 

Australian businesses embrace enterprise mobility with market set to approach $5.5 billion by 2020 as organisations go “mobile first”

Mobile device management used by half of Australian organisations, business process re-engineering still nascent

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – Australian businesses are investing more in enterprise mobility management tools as the market for management software, devices and services will approach $5.5 billion by the end of the decade, up from $3.3 billion in 2016, according to new research from emerging technology analyst firm Telsyte.

New findings from the Telsyte Australian Enterprise Mobility Market Study 2017 predict the enterprise mobility market will consist of $1.9BN worth of devices (smartphones and tablets), $1.2B worth of management tools (including MDM) and $2.3Bn of integration and support services by 2020 as more businesses move to a mobile first strategy and regularly support a workforce that is increasingly able to work anywhere.

Telsyte defines MDM as a cross-platform application to manage devices, applications, data and content on smartphones and tablets (often also called EMM or MAM).

According to Telsyte, 34 per cent of businesses have staff that regularly work outside of the work premises, which has been a consistent trend over the past two years.

Furthermore, mobility is becoming more strategic for corporations, with C-Suite executives now in charge of mobility in 80 per cent of organisations, up from 62 per cent in 2014.

Despite the rise in BYOD (bring your own device), almost 80 per cent of business still buy some smartphones for staff, and 50 per cent buy tablets. Almost half of all tablets purchased have cellular features given the productivity benefits from an always-on connection.

The two big consumer smartphone brands also dominate the enterprise, with most organisations purchasing Apple and Samsung smartphones in that order.

 Bring your own apps (BYOA) grows up

Bring your own apps (BYOA), a term coined by Telsyte more than four years ago, has started to gather steam in the Australian market.

BYOA awareness has increased and more organisations are trying to enforce rules that stop or limit the use of consumer grade apps for workplace use, mainly due to security fears. However, Telsyte’s latest research shows organisations’ efforts are being overwhelmed.

"Despite the fears, around 10 per cent of organisations admit they can’t control BYOA and staff use personal apps regardless of policies," Telsyte Senior Analyst, Rodney Gedda, says.

Around half of all businesses with greater than 20 employees allow BYOA, with most citing productivity and employee demand as the main reasons, as well as lack of training needed to use apps.

"With arrival of Facebook’s Workplace, more companies will look to enterprise applications that leverage consumer platforms to reduce training requirements and promote adoption, a trend that has been a driver of BYOA in the past," Gedda says.

The main personal applications used in in the workplace are e-mail, file storage (e.g. Dropbox) and project/task management. Group calendaring is also on the rise.

However, concerns remain around data privacy and security of BYOA apps in the minds of more than a third of all CIOs.

 MDM growing amid security concerns, BYOA

Telsyte estimates that almost half of all organisations in Australia now have an enterprise-grade MDM with this expected to near 70 per cent by 2020.

Australian enterprises still have a lot of opportunity to go beyond basic management and re-engineer business processes with mobile devices and applications. Telsyte research shows less than 20 per cent are mature with their enterprise mobility and realising innovation and productivity benefits.

The leading MDM vendors in Australia, according to Telsyte research, are BlackBerry (following the acquisition and integration of Good Technology), IBM and Samsung in that order.

The growth in MDM is being driven by a high rate (86 per cent) of enterprises still concerned about the security of enterprise mobility.

This includes inadequate separation between work-related use and personal use of a device and the security of devices that have access to corporate information but are not corporately managed.

For further information on the study or media enquiries contact:

Rodney Gedda
Senior Analyst
Tel: +61 2 9235 5891
Email: rgedda@telsyte.com.au

The Telsyte Australian Enterprise Mobility Market Study 2017 is a comprehensive study which provides subscribers with:

  • The size of the enterprise mobility market and what is it forecast to reach in 2020
  • The market split between mobile devices, software and services
  • The market penetration for mobile device management
  • How organisations procure mobile devices
  • How organisations are using MDM to manage and secure mobile devices and apps
  • The state of BYOD (including wearables) and BYOA (apps)
  • How people work outside the office, including remote locations
  • Are organisations adopting wearable computers and how they are viewed by CIOs
  • How mobility is impacting sales and operations
  • Is the CIO losing control of enterprise mobility?

In preparing this study, Telsyte used:

  • An online survey of a representative sample of 257 Australian CIOs, IT managers and enterprise mobility managers in August 2016.
  • Interviews conducted with executives from service providers, network operators, manufacturers, retailers, financial analysts and channel partners.
  • Financial reports released by service providers and manufacturers.
  • On-going monitoring of local and global market and vendor trends.

About Telsyte

Telsyte delivers strategic insights and advisory services to businesses that are producing, or are impacted by, disruptive technologies. Telsyte publishes studies into emerging consumer and business markets and provides custom research and advisory services. Telsyte is an independent business unit of CSC.

The material in this article is copyright protected and not intended to be altered, copied, distributed or used for any commercial or non-commercial purpose, except for news reporting, comment, criticism, teaching and scholarship.